Travel Guide

NUS Museum
Address: University Cultural Centre, National University of Singapore, 50 Kent Ridge Crescent
Contact: (+65) 6516 8817
Operating Hours: Monday & Public Holidays: Closed
Tuesday - Saturday: 10am to 7.30pm
Sunday: 10am to 6pm

Discover the genius behind Singapore's many sculptures alongside over 7000 Southeast Asian artefacts housed at the NUS Museum.

Owned by the National University of Singapore (NUS) itself, the NUS Museum showcases the private collections of famous sculptor and potter Mr. Ng Eng Teng and one of Southeast Asia's richest men, Mr. Lee Kong Chian, who have the Art Museum and the Gallery named after them respectively.

The Ng Eng Teng Gallery archives the works of the Singaporean painter, potter and sculptor Mr Ng Eng Teng (1934 - 2001), housing 1,000 of his works varying from sketches, paintings and sculptures, to figurines and pottery.

Ng Eng Teng, was more affectionately known as the Grandfather of Singaporean sculptures. His works include the Mother and Child bronze sculpture outside Far East Shopping Centre along Orchard Road, as well as The Explorer at the back of the Singapore Art Museum.

The major Chinese collection of the Lee Kong Chian Art Museum, entitled Ways of Seeing Chinese Art, has been refurbished and features over 100 ceramic objects. These date back to prehistory to early 20th century wares, produced by China's major kilns, presenting visitors with a comprehensive summary of the history of Chinese ceramic art, as well as endowing depth and breadth to the ceramics collection. More than 200 ceramics, jades and bronzes from the Lee Kong Chian art collection are displayed.

Lee Kong Chian (1893 - 1967) was one of Southeast Asia's richest men in the 1950s and 1960s, and the founder of the Lee Foundation in Singapore. He came to Singapore in 1903 to study, and after he graduated from one of the top colleges in China, he returned to Singapore.

Up on the second level lies a third area - the South & Southeast Asian Gallery.

The Southeast Asian Gallery is a feature exhibit that changes approximately once every four months, showcasing artworks and artefacts from both local and other Southeast Asia regions. It was started as a teaching collection in 1955 and grew under the guidance of art historians such as Michael Sullican and William Willetts. The collection has five main categories - paintings, drawings, ceramics, sculptures, bronzes, and textiles, which present a holistic account of Southeast Asian art.

Located at the University Cultural Centre at NUS' Kent Ridge campus itself, the NUS Museum serves as an extension to NUS' mission to providing a well-rounded education and creating an intellectually and culturally vibrant milieu.


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